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Real Men Crochet Paracord

Real Men Crochet Paracord/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379d82414b4_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379d82414b4_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } Crochet Paracord: Just Another Reason to Learn Crocheting You can crochet with anything! And that means items you'd normally throw away can be turned into any number of handy items. I have seen multiple examples of projects crocheted from plastic bags, T-shirt fabric and even cassette tapes . I will even admit to a single occasion when I attempted to crochet with licorice. It is very difficult as the strands break easily and just taste so good. The point is that crochet skills are a tool to turn any length of material into pouches, bags, netting, cords, belts and more . Related GunDigest Articles Real Avid Introduces the Gun Boss AK47 Cleaning Kit Photos: 5 Best Survival Handguns This is especially true when it comes time to crochet paracord for later use. Why to Learn How to Crochet Paracord A few days ago, my dad sent me a short video about a guy who knits with parachute cord, allowing him to create a strong strap and convert a large length of cord to a utilitarian and manageable length. This practice is popular with those preparing for emergencies, outdoors enthusiasts and many others. In a situation that demands a length of parachute cord, it's important to be able to unravel paracord in a hurry. While some wear paracord bracelets for this purpose, going the DIY route and crocheting paracord is a good choice for making customized widths and lengths of paracord. Instead of just paracord bracelets, you could make any number of wearable options.

4 Hot New Remington Handguns To Take Aim At (2019)

4 Hot New Remington Handguns To Take Aim At (2019)

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379d1530f79_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379d1530f79_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } Bouncing back from bankruptcy, Big Green is still turning out top guns. Here are four Remington handguns worth drawing a bead on. What are the new Remington handguns for 2019: Remington R1 1911 Limited Tomasie Custom Remington RM380 Executive Remington RM380 Light Blue Stainless Remington 700 CP (Chassis Pistol) Remington is still alive and kicking. Considered for the better part of two centuries the standard in firearms, the New York-based company is rebounding from its 2018 bankruptcy. The same holds true for its sister brands, including DPMS, Marlin, Bushmaster and Dakota Arms. Jay Pinsky had the opportunity (he said privilege) of spending 3 days with the Remington staff at one of their ammunition facilities in Lonoke, Ark. While there, the men and women of the company proudly showcased what’s next for the iconic gunmaker. And it’s nothing short of fantastic. Related GunDigest Articles Video: What The Smith & Wesson M&P Shield Has To Offer 16 Top Picks For Concealed Carry Handguns (2020) 5 Best Steel Targets For Years Of Shooting Fun Best Starter Kit for Concealed Carry: S&W M&P 9 SHIELD $394.96 guns.com Safariland IWB Holster $43.99 brownells.com Safariland Duty Belt $88.99 brownells.com SnagMag Ammo Pouch $LOW! gundigeststore.com Disclosure: Some of these links are affiliate links. Caribou Media Group may earn a commission from qualifying purchases. Thank you! Here, brand new for 2019, are four of the hot new handguns Remington has in store for shooters and shows Big Green is still on its game. Remington R1 "1911 Limited Tomasie" Custom Travis Tomasie and Remington teamed up to create a custom 1911, chambered in the steel-popping .40 S&W. The 5-inch handgun features a ramped, match-grade bull barrel, ported slide, LPA fully adjustable match sights, EGW competition hammer, extended beavertail grip safety, adjustable skeletonized trigger, PVD DLC finish, an oversized competition magazine well and VZ G10 grips. MSRP: $1,650 Remington RM380 Executive The pint-sized RM380 gets a suit and tie in an executive trim level. The ultra-small CCW handgun features Macassar laminated grips, stainless and nickel-coated components, a double-action trigger, low-profile slide stop and ambidextrous magazine release. MSRP: $405 More Handgun Information: Gun Review: Kimber’s Mighty Micro 9 CZ Expands The P-10 Series The Right-Sized FN 509 Midsize The .357 Magnum Colt King Cobra Makes Its Return Perfect Pairs EDC Gun and Knife Combos Remington RM380 "Light Blue Stainless" The RM380 pistol also gets colorful with a new robin’s egg blue Cerekote finish. The pistol has stainless and nickel-coated components, a double-action trigger, low-profile slide stop and ambidextrous magazine release. MSRP: $415 Remington 700 CP (Chassis Pistol) The Remington Model 700 now comes in a pistol version. The Model 700 action is matched to a Remington Precision chassis with a QD sling-plate adapter, M-Lok adaptable free-float tube, full Picatinny rail and a threaded barrel. The pistols come in three different versions: The .300 Blackout has a 10.5-inch barrel, the .308 Winchester has a 12.5-inch barrel, and the .223 Remington has a 10.5-inch barrel. MSRP: $1,020 Editor's Note: This article originally appeared in the January 2019 issue of Gun Digest the Magazine . We Found Bulk Ammo In Stock: Ammo from $14.60 creedmoorsports.com Ammo Sale from $6.99 brownells.com Disclosure: These links are affiliate links. "Caribou Media Group" earns a commission from qualifying purchases. Thank you! NEXT STEP: Download Your Free Storm Tactical Printable Target Pack 62 Printable MOA Targets with DOT Drills - Rifle Range in YARDS This impressive target pack from our friends at Storm Tactical contains 62 printable targets for rifle and handgun range use. Target grids and bullseye sizes are in MOA. Ideal for long-range shooting! Get Free Targets

Hunting Turkeys with Handguns [Guns, Ammo, Tips]

Hunting Turkeys with Handguns [Guns, Ammo, Tips]

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s It’s the sound we all live for as turkey hunters–the gobble of a Tom in search of a hen. Then there’s the sight of a gobbler strutting and drumming into range. There’s just nothing better in life… unless we’re talking hunting turkeys with handguns instead of shotguns. Nothing quite like a double on turkeys Now that right there is awesome. I know what you’re thinking–handgun hunting requires a significantly closer range and firing with greater precision than a shotgun. Those things add a layer of challenge to the hunt because, hey, there is a reason we get all kitted up in head-to-toe camo including a face mask and gloves during wild turkey season. Turkeys have phenomenal eyesight; they see approximately three times better than you, and yes they will absolutely see you coming or fidgeting. Their vision is monocular but they cope easily by turning their heads and their peripheral vision is way better than ours. Big ol’ gobbler! We camo up and hold as close to preternaturally still as possible so they won’t see us coming because if they spot us, they are gone. So how do we get it done with a handgun? Not only is it doable, but it’s also ridiculously fun. Here are a few tips and tricks for getting up close and personal with a big Tom next turkey season. First, a side note on speed. How fast can they move? A determined turkey can take flight–briefly–at speeds up to 55 miles per hour (for real). Flying Turkey If for some reason they’re grounded they can still run away from you at 25 miles per hour. Suffice to say, you really don’t want to be spotted. Are you up for a challenge? Read on. Table of Contents Loading... Handgun Selection Choosing a handgun specifically for hunting requires taking various factors into consideration. Popular Pistol Calibers Perhaps most importantly, you must select a gun you’re comfortable shooting. There are a ton of options out there from revolvers to single-shot pistols to bolt pistols. When you grab a handgun for hunting, choose one with an action you’re either already familiar with or one you’re willing and able to spend time training with. After all, our goal as hunters is always an ethical kill through solid shot placement. Caliber is debated when it comes to which one to use on a turkey. The Magnum Research BFR in .50 Linebaugh is definitely an effective hunting revolver (and it’s fun, too) .223 Remington and above are good rifle cartridge choices as are handgun cartridges such as 10mm and .44 Magnum. In my experience, the smaller handgun cartridges like 9mm result in poor penetration and far too narrow a permanent cavity meaning the bird runs off and may or may not be found (and may or may not be dead). 10mm is awesome, take a look at the Best 10mm Pistols and the Best 10mm Ammo ! There are always exceptions when someone actually manages to drop a turkey with a smaller caliber but when hunting you should supremely confident in your chosen caliber. It can and should deliver a one-shot kill with proper placement. Yes, you can kill a turkey with a handgun and a single shot fired. That means larger, not smaller, although if you go too big–like the time I used a 7mm-08–your bullet is definitely going to destroy the meat. To preserve meat find a happy medium and remember, ethics always trump the cool factor of saying you shot a turkey with a diminutive caliber. “But muh 9mm/45 ACP” is not a valid argument for hunting with those calibers. Tom down with a .308 Win. The nice thing about bolt pistols is the wide array of rifle calibers they can be chambered in Barrel length matters, too. There’s a reason handguns made specifically for hunting have longer barrels (it’s ballistics, okay?). Running out into the woods with your compact pistol is not exactly what we call A Good Idea. I have a Remington R1 10mm Hunter with a five-inch barrel that’s fantastic for hunting but I also love the Remington XP100 bolt-action pistol and the Ruger Super Redhawk in .44 Magnum. Best Big Game Handgun "Ruger Super Redhawk" 1090 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 1090 at Brownells Compare prices (2 found) Brownells (See Price) Cabelas (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing Whatever you use needs to be substantial enough to get it done quickly and efficiently. No Bueno calibers include .22 LR, .380 ACP, 9mm, and .45 ACP–basically any caliber that isn’t big enough or fast enough for single-shot use. Ammo Choices (This One’s Simpler) Ammunition selection is the same as it would be for any hunt. Choose proven hunting rounds, not FMJs. In fact, if you ever use FMJs to hunt just get out right now. Barnes VOR-TX is an example of a fantastic hunting line. VOR-TX bullets have excellent weight retention, double-diameter expansion, and superior accuracy. Barnes VOR-TX 25 at Lucky Gunner Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 25 at Lucky Gunner Prices accurate at time of writing Those are all features you should expect from your hunting ammunition. Over the years Barnes has proven itself to me on a wide variety of game, including turkeys. Keep in mind turkeys have softer tissue and a bullet is highly unlikely to have a chance to expand like it would striking a more solid object. That’s just one of many reasons you need a bigger caliber capable of producing a much bigger wound cavity. Why yes, the Magnum Research .429 Desert Eagle does drop turkeys on the spot. Sometimes bigger really is better One more time for the cheap seats: do not use tiny calibers to hunt. Your 9mm is not a hunting gun. Yes, a bolt pistol is technically a handgun. And yes, a Desert Eagle gets the job done in spades. Optic Ready Consider using a scope or red dot for handgun hunting turkeys. Magnum Research . "429 Desert Eagle" with SwampFox King Slayer red dot proven turkey killer Sure, it’s possible to have a successful hunt without one but the odds tip in your favor when you use an optics. Even better there are all kinds of options on the market for handguns. There’s the Leupold FX-II Handgun 4x28mm , a reliable model for revolvers that nails a broad field of vision, clarity, and durability. Leupold FX-II Handgun 4x28mm 400 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 400 at Amazon Compare prices (3 found) Amazon (See Price) OpticsPlanet (See Price) Brownells (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing Then there’s the Leupold VX-3 Handgun 2.5-8x32mm which I’ve used on bolt pistols hunting turkeys. And if you’d like a red dot there’s the Trijicon RMR , Trijicon SRO , and SwampFox King Slayer . Best Pistol Red Dot Trijicon RMR Type 2 469 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 469 at Brownells Compare prices (4 found) Brownells (See Price) OpticsPlanet (See Price) Amazon (See Price) Rainier Arms (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing High-magnification scopes are not necessary for hunting turkeys but do make sure it is suited to your caliber, has a readily visible reticle or dot, and doesn’t hinder your field of vision. Practice, Practice, Practice Firing a few shots down-range is not remotely sufficient to prepare you for a handgun hunt–or any hunt. Those guys who hit the range the day before a hunt and sling a couple of rounds down-range then saunter off as though they’ve fulfilled their training requirements for the year are nothing but a joke. Guys who hardly practice at the range = this dude. Practice with your handgun and load it with the ammunition you will hunt with. Starting from the bench is totally fine; once your optic is zeroed, work on groups and consistent accuracy. Once you nail down reliable performance from the bench start shooting like you’re going to during the hunt. That might mean shooting stick–yes, you can and should use sticks with handguns–or it might just mean firing from a seated or prone position. Handgun Hunting with a Shooting Stick Stability is vital and so is shooting at a variety of distances. Before you hit the woods you have to be familiar with your gun’s drift and drop at various ranges to ensure a clean kill. Something I freaking love for hunt prep: Birchwood Casey’s line of hunting targets. They’re absolutely perfect for training to handgun hunt. Birchwood Casey turkey target Best of all the Birchwood Casey Pregame 12×18 Turkey Targets are full-color and reactive; when you shoot the paper turkey the holes show up ringed by contrasting colors so you can see exactly where your shots hit. That can make it easier to visualize and assess shot placement from a distance while giving you an admittedly flat wild turkey to practice on. Placement Matters (Big Time) Shot placement with turkeys is a bit different using a handgun than with a shotgun. When you’re out with a shotgun loaded with magnum turkey loads you just aim at their head and neck and it’s all over but the field dressing. With handguns, though, you need to be more precise. Yes, the head and neck remain the wild turkey’s most vulnerable area and you can certainly aim for where the neck meets the feathers. A variety of options to shoot a turkey. However, due to their quick, jerky movements, you are going to be better off aiming somewhere a bit more stationary. One option is to aim right above a leg through the wing, a mid-body shot that usually preserves the breast meat. It’s worth noticing how much the turkey’s body changes with their stance. If the turkey is facing away you can take a shot mid-body where the wings meet on their back but this placement is pretty likely to damage breast meat. Be patient and wait until they turn so you can take a broadside mid-body shot to get the most meat out of your bird. Turkey back shot Bottom line: you can basically aim at the middle of their body. The angle and caliber decide what meat will be damaged by the bullet and how effective your shot will be, so plan accordingly. Once again, no tiny calibers. A narrow through-and-through hole isn’t going to drop your turkey it’s just going to wound them. The Hunt is On Treat handgun hunting turkeys just like any hunt. You’re going to need the same camo, scent control, stillness, and silence. Okay, so you might need an extra dose of stillness to drop a turkey with a handgun. Easy there, cowboy. We said nice and still . Get in place, don’t move, and call. When that longbeard comes into range, take your time. Handguns require patience and a smooth trigger press, roll, or squeeze–whatever you want to call it, just make it good. The moment will come when you have a clear shot and good placement and your turkey is going to go down. It’s a fairly epic moment. Disclaimer: it is your responsibility to be familiar with the handgun hunting laws wherever you’re hitting the woods and fields. Not every state or county allows handgun hunting turkeys. Following the law is up to you, so check it out. Bolt pistol turkey for the win There’s nothing quite like turkey hunting with handguns. It’s a challenge, one I highly recommend. Go find a handgun and start prepping for turkey season and your first handgun turkey. The turkey woods will never be the same. And if you aren’t a hunter yet, well, this is a badass way to get started. Ever hunted a turkey with a handgun? What did you use? Tell us about it in the comments. Need an optic for your turkey hunting handgun? Hit up our list of the Best Pistol Red Dots . Some of the awesome Pistol Red Dots we tested!

Minimalist Masterpiece: Colt Wiley Clapp Stainless Commander

Minimalist Masterpiece: Colt Wiley Clapp Stainless Commander

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379cc4df885_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379cc4df885_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } Elegant yet functional, the new Colt Wiley Clapp Stainless Commander is everything you need and nothing you don’t. An old school gun writer sometimes considered alongside such greats as Elmer Keith, Skeeter Skelton, Bill Jordan and others, Wiley Clapp has had a long and illustrious career in the gun industry. In addition to his many published works, Clapp served as a Marine during the Vietnam War and followed up his military service with around two decades of law enforcement experience as a deputy sheriff in Southern California. This time and experience with firearms and their applications have left him with a lot of practical expertise and opinions regarding what works and what doesn’t. This is something Colt has capitalized on in recent years. Related GunDigest Articles First Look: Colt Wiley Clapp Lightweight Commander Colt Introduces Stainless Steel Competition Pistol Models 1911 Review: Colt Lightweight Commander Best Starter Kit for Concealed Carry: S&W M&P 9 SHIELD $394.96 guns.com Safariland IWB Holster $43.99 brownells.com Safariland Duty Belt $88.99 brownells.com SnagMag Ammo Pouch $LOW! gundigeststore.com Disclosure: Some of these links are affiliate links. Caribou Media Group may earn a commission from qualifying purchases. Thank you! Taking advice from Clapp regarding specifications and design, Colt has produced an entire series of TALO dealer-exclusive 1911s bearing the prominent gun writer’s name. So far, this series has comprised of the Wiley Clapp CCO, the Wiley Clapp Lightweight Commander and the Wiley Clapp Government Model. Now, for 2016, Colt is adding another pistol to the Wiley Clapp line, this one an all-stainless steel version of the Commander pistol. Designed with specifications input from Clapp, the new "Wiley Clapp Stainless" Commander is an elegant, custom-quality 1911 purpose-built for carry and defensive use. Featuring a stainless frame and slide and a set of classy, tapered wood grips with fingerprint checkering, the Wiley Clapp Stainless Commander is a striking firearm. The tapered grips combine with the fingerprint checkering for an excellent feel in the hand, with the checkering offering enough grip without becoming abrasive and without the potential for snagging on clothing on the draw. In addition to the fingerprint checkering, the Stainless Commander also comes with famed metal smith Pete Single’s checkering on the front and back strap. The checkering is 25 lines per inch (lpi) and is quite comfortable on the hands while allowing for plenty of grip. This checkering is complemented with a slightly undercut trigger guard and an upswept Beavertail grip safety, both of which permit a solid grip for stable and accurate shooting. One of the more interesting design choices on the Wiley Clapp Stainless Commander is its use of a Novak Brass Bead front sight. Many of today’s pistols feature Tritium or a fiber optic front sight, but the brass bead pairs really well with the firearm’s Novak Low Mount Carry rear sights that feature a wider than normal rear notch. Target acquisition with the Stainless Commander’s sights is quick and efficient, with the brass bead serving as an easy-to-see reference. A practical aspect of the Stainless Commander’s design owing to Clapp’s extensive shooting experience and background, the gun utilizes minimalist controls to keep the firearm as unobtrusive and carry-friendly as possible. In the words of Wiley himself at a recent Colt media event, there is “nothing you don’t need for defensive purposes” on the Stainless Commander.

Demystifying Shotgun Shell Terms

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s Nine Millimeter Hollow Point?  Straightforward. Forty Five ACP Full Metal Jacket?  Makes Sense. Twelve Gauge Number Two Game Load?  Lol wut? I mean, I get the 12 Gauge part.  That “number 2” thing can’t mean what I think it means because who’d want to advertise THAT about their ammo?  What kind of game?  Is it a first person shooter or a real time strategy game?  Why do shotguns have to be so complicated?! And if you didn’t get the 9mm Hollow Point part…check out our Basic Bullet Guide first! Let’s just take a deep breath and break this down a bit. There is a lot of different shotgun ammo out there.  Each individual shell size has more variations than any other type of ammo. As a result, people new to shotguns or shooting in general may be a bit overwhelmed or confused.  I know I was when I got my first pump action. While different boxes may state things differently, a full description of shotgun ammo goes a little something like this: Shell Size | Shot Size | Shot Type | Shot Material | Shell Length Estate Shotgun Shells Shell Size The shell size is probably the most straightforward of the descriptions. If you have a 12 gauge shotgun, get 12 gauge shells. There’s not really any “interchangeable” rounds like in rifles or pistols. As for the shells themselves, the smaller the number, the larger the shell.  So a 20 gauge shell is going to be smaller than a 12 gauge. The only exception is the .410 round. Don’t make the mistake of calling it a “.410 gauge” because, for some odd reason, they decided not to use gauge with that particular size.  The proper name for that is “.410 bore”. Fun fact: the .410 bore shell would technically be a 68 gauge round. Now, if you’re using a slug (~1oz piece of metal instead of the standard “shot”), you can pretty much stop at the shell size. There are some descriptors used only on slugs but those typically mirror that of pistol and rifle ammo.  You might see “12 gauge hollow point slug” or “20 gauge fragmenting slug”.  It means the same thing as if it were “9mm” and “5.56” instead of the gauge. Just a side note about slugs: in my testing, they seem to have a noticeably higher amount of recoil than their pellet filled siblings.  Your mileage may vary. Shot Type We’re going to jump ahead a bit however and look at the “Shot Type” trait.  For the most part, you’re going to be looking at 3 flavors: Target Load As the name implies, these are really for target shooting.  The bright side here is that target loads are no different from birdshot.  They just have a smaller amount of powder and a pretty limited selection of shot size.  Typically, you’ll see Number 7 ½, 8, 9 sizes.  For the most part, you can use 7 ½ for pretty much all your clay shooting but if you want to get picky, #8 and #9 are better for Skeet and #7 ½ is best for Trap. Birdshot This style of shot shells are used for…you guessed it: birds.  They’re also good for snakes, critters and rodents as well, I might add. Birdshot is typically labelled with either the shot size itself (#1-#10 and higher in the U.S.) or by the game it’s intended for (Pheasant, Quail, Squirrel, etc).  While some would say it’s acceptable for home defense, those people should be ignored.  That discussion is for another article but for now, if you want a home defense shot, take a look at…. Buckshot You want to shoot something big?  Buckshot.  You want to remove a threat from your home?  Buckshot.  You want to slow down a T-1000?  Time to get some buckshot.  Buckshot is often labeled with the # similar to birdshot but it almost always has “buck” following it.  For example: “#1 Buck” or “#3 Buck”.  Once again, the smaller the number, the larger the shot size.  With buck, however, you get the added bonus of #0, #00 and #000.  Think of those as 0, -2, and -3 in the “smaller number scale”.  The 0’s, which are also called “ought” are some big mamma jammas and typically the most readily available.  Your double-ought buck is probably the most common you’re going to find and more than appropriate for hunting deer or stopping a home invader.   It should not, however, be used for birds or clay shooting. Shot Size Shot Size Chart, Shotgunworld As you may have noticed, each type of shot also has its own variations of measurements. These are standard sized that can easily be calculated…although each type has its own calculations. For birdshot, subtracting the shot size number (i.e. #8) from 17 will give you the size of the pellets in hundredths of an inch. So 17-8 would be .09” in diameter. For buckshot, I can’t for the life of me figure out how they’re calculating it.  Still, the typical rule applies: smaller number = bigger pellet. 12 ga Birdshot Shot Material This part comes down to two main options: steel and lead. Most skeet shooting ranges don’t like you using steel shot as it is more likely to damage their machines if you miss.  Conversely, a lot of states don’t like you using lead ammo as it can pollute water supplies. There are also some more exotic materials available like bismuth or tungsten but, in all honesty, I’ve never seen those for sale in any of my local stores.  Heck, I don’t think I’ve seen them at my local gun shows either. Either way, the best way to decide here is check the rules and regulations of wherever you’re planning on shooting them. Shell Length The bigger the shell, the more powder and shot in it. Also the more recoil and more stress on your gun. The vast majority of shells you’re going to come across are 2 ½ to 2 ¾ inches in length.  Three inch shells are also widely available but many shotguns warn against using them.  It’s kind of like pistols and +P loads: if your gun doesn’t explicitly say you can use them, don’t use them. Hopefully this article will act as a bit of an Enigma Machine for your as you browse the shotgun ammo section of your local sporting goods store. It’s not that bad once you break down the code. If you need ammo, check out our Best Shotgun Ammo for Self Defense and Plinking article and if you want to learn more about non-shotgun cartridges, check out our "Basic Bullet Guide" . Previous Comments: Posted @ 1/19/2015 5:05 PM by Daniel E. Watters One common misconception I see regards shot shell lengths. The listed length of the shot shell is based on the uncrimped length of the hull. However, the loaded length can vary depending upon the type of crimp applied. The “roll crimp” is typically used in slug loads or for shot shells that use a paper card or other wad on top to hold the shot with the hull. The end of the hull is simply rolled over inside to hold the card or slug in place. Today, the roll crimp is more commonly seen on slug loads. For shot loads, you are more likely to see the folded “star crimp”. Since the top of the hull is folded to meet over the center, loaded shot shells with star crimped hulls are significantly shorter than roll crimped hulls. This difference can effect magazine tube capacity, but more importantly, there is a safety concern if a star crimped 3″ shell ends up short enough to fit inside a 2.75″ chamber. If fired, the shorter chamber won’t allow the longer hull to completely unfold its crimp, potentially resulting in unsafe pressures.

Best Ammunition Capacity For A Concealed Carry Gun

What is the best ammunition capacity for a concealed carry gun? It’s highly subjective, actually; it really comes down to how much you want to carry around at any given time. Some people are just fine with a 2 in a derringer, 5in a snubbie or 7 in a 1911…but some people prefer to have 15+1 in a Glock 19. How Much Ammunition Is Necessary? The eternal debate is just how much ammunition is necessary, and a lot of different people have different preferences about the amount of ammunition that they prefer to carry. Again, some people are just fine with 5 or 6 in a snubbie, some people are just fine with that amount or perhaps a couple more in a single-stack subcompact (or a 1911 of any size) and some people want a compact double-stack holding a dozen or more. In a more objective, data-driven sense, the truth is that you don’t know how much ammunition you’ll need until the moment a defensive shooting happens and you can’t anticipate what that’s going to be. What data there is (such as FBI and police reports of officer-involved shootings or the scant few regarding citizens defending themselves) indicate that most defensive encounters are resolved with only a few shots fired and at close range. Since that’s what could roughly be presumed to be “on average,” a carrying capacity of 5 to 8 rounds is probably sufficient. But there are plenty of instances where that wasn’t enough. There are plenty of documented instances of officer-involved shootings where two to three magazines were needed to stop the threat. Then there are incidents where a dozens, if not hundreds, of rounds are needed, such as the 1986 Miami shootout or the 1997 North Hollywood shootout. So, how many rounds does a person need to carry? The truth is that if you needed to shoot in self-defense, probably only a few…but you might need more. Capacity Balances With Concealability However, there’s another factor that should be considered along with capacity, which is concealability. Just like with anything else, desired attributes in a carry gun involve a trade with another. What goes with increased capacity is overall size, as a larger carrying capacity dictates that a firearm be large enough to accommodate the number of rounds. For instance, a lot of people carry a Glock 19 every day, but some people insist that the 19 is too big to be a daily CCW. For instance, if you carry anything other than a Glock 26 in an appendix carry holster, the Reddit CCW page will lose its collective mind. The point is that the easier a gun generally is to conceal, the fewer rounds it will generally hold. Not always, but that’s often the case. If you are wondering what type of ammo to carry, then check out alien gear’s guide to ammunition . Granted, there is always some leeway. The bigger the person, generally the bigger the firearm they can effectively conceal. Why does this matter? Because a person may have to balance the capacity they want to carry on a daily basis with a pistol they can effectively conceal. As a result, every person is going to have to figure out for themselves how many rounds they want to carry and plan accordingly. The perfect amount is really a balance between how many you want to carry and what you can effectively conceal. by Sam Hoober Sam Hoober is the Contributing Editor for AlienGearHolsters.com , a concealed carry holsters company, where he writes about concealed carry, gun safety, and more.

Summary

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